Prescott Named Best Value Town in the SW by Sunset Magazine

Living in Prescott, Arizona, you’d be hard pressed to find someone who didn’t absolutely love our small town.

With the amazing outdoor living, four mild seasons of weather, beautiful nature scenery and downtown, and so much more, it’s not surprising that Prescott has been recognized on multiple occasions by numerous printing presses around the nation. From Arizona magazines to national magazines such as Times, Prescott has had more than its fair share of the spotlight.

This time, Prescott has been named the best Value town in the whole Southwest by Sunset Magazine, beating out Scottsdale, Silver City, New Mexico, and Los Alamos, New Mexico.

The article talked about Prescott’s quality of life, emphasizing outdoor recreation such as our amazing trails and lakes. With our dramatic boulder landscapes to our towering pines, there are plenty of scenic places and vistas to awe and inspire. The article also touched on our Old West heritage, mentioning the Palace and Whiskey Row.

Precott E-News said that City Manager Michael Lamar, is pleased that Prescott is earning positive recognition.  “It’s easy to see why Prescott is being recognized in so many ways,” he said. “There is so much opportunity including heritage, arts, culture, outdoor recreation, and a variety of educational opportunities.  We believe that Prescott is on the rise, and recognition like this confirms it.”

To read everything Sunset Magazine had to say, you can click here to read the article.

A growing population of over 40,000 people, homes prices and sales on the rise, and continual recognition in the press, whether we like it or not, the word is out about how great our little town is, and people want in!

Are you or someone you know looking to move to Prescott? We’d love to help you in your buying and selling needs! Give us a call at 928-771-1111, or e-mails us at info@kathleeny.com.

 

9/11

September 11th is tomorrow. It’s been eighteen years since one of the most memorable days in the history of the United States when more than 3,000 people were killed in multiple terrorist attacks on the East Coast.

When looking for the right things  to say to convey the gravity and magnitude of this horrid day, there were/are no words to encapsulate it.

Researching 9/11 for content for this blog, we came upon this video from history.com. Striking awe and unspeakable sadness in us with a small glimpse reminding us of how awful this day truly was, this video is better than anything we could say. September 11, 2001. We will never forget.

September 11th Facts from CNN.com:
  • Nineteen men hijacked four fuel-loaded US commercial airplanes bound for west coast destinations. In the attacks, people were killed in New York City, Washington, DC and outside of Shanksville, Pennsylvania. The attack was orchestrated by al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden.
  • At the World Trade Center (WTC) site in Lower Manhattan, 2,753 people were killed when hijacked American Airlines Flight 11 and United Airlines Flight 175 were intentionally crashed into the north and south towers, or as a result of the crashes.
  • Of those who perished during the initial attacks and the subsequent collapses of the towers, 343 were New York City firefighters, 23 were New York City police officers and 37 were officers at the Port Authority. The victims ranged in age from two to 85 years. Approximately 75-80% of the victims were men.
  • At the Pentagon in Washington, 184 people were killed when hijacked American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the building.
  • Near Shanksville, Pennsylvania, 40 passengers and crew members aboard United Airlines Flight 93 died when the plane crashed into a field. It is believed that the hijackers crashed the plane in that location, rather than their unknown target, after the passengers and crew attempted to retake control of the flight deck.
  • As of July 2019, 1,644 (60%) of 2,753 WTC victims’ remains have been positively identified, according to the medical examiner’s office.

9/11 Remembrance in Prescott, Arizona:

If you’re looking for a way to further remember this day, don’t forget about Healing Fields going on at the Prescott Valley Civic Center Lawn this week. Stop by to see each life lost on 9/11 represented by an American flag, including a short bio of their life. For more information about this week long event, check out our blog about it here.

 

Healing Fields 2019!

Tomorrow, Friday, September 6th, is the beginning of Patriot Week. From September sixth at 10AM to September thirteenth at the Prescott Valley Civic Center Theater on the Green, there will be the 9th annual Healing Fields event.

Healing fields is special and awing event held every year over Patriots Week to remember the event of 9/11, and the lives lost that day.

Healingfield.org says:

“Commemorating the anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks of 2001, Prescott Valley will continue its proud 8-year tradition as Northern Arizona residents come together to experience this awe-inspiring display of the Stars and Stripes. 3,000 U.S. flags flying at the Civic Center will again create an unforgettable panorama of optimism and healing. Area residents may visit the display at the Prescott Valley Town Center from Friday, September 6th through Friday, September 13th of 2019. The Prescott Valley Healing Field display is a gift to the community made possible through donations, sponsorships and the efforts of many dedicated volunteers. You can show your support and gratitude by sponsoring a flag or making a donation. We invite all to visit the Prescott Valley’s display and walk with us among the posted flags. The display is open to all without charge. The North Arizona Healing Field is a not to be missed event.”

The 3,000 flags are for those who lost their lives on 9/11 and each flag represents a person who perished on that day and is accompanied by a short bio and display set up on the flag.

Along with the display of flags, there will also be various events going on throughout the week to participate in and bring your friends and family to:

September 6 – September 13th: Healing Field flags on display around the clock.

Saturday, September 7th at 7AM: 2019 Patriot Run

Saturday, September 7th at 9:30AM: Blessing of the Fields

Saturday, September 7th at 6PM: Patriotic Youth Concert

Tuesday, September 10th at 6PM: FREE Community Concert High Desert Brass

Wednesday, September 11th, at 6PM: Ceremony honoring those who lost their lives on September 11th, 2001.

*All concerts and programs are at Theater on the Green at the Prescott Valley Civic Center.

Proceeds from these events go to benefit the Central Arizona Honor Guard travel fund to pay respects to fallen firefighters.

If you’d like to be involved in this beautiful event, you can still sign up to volunteer by contacting Molly at healingfieldpv@gmail.com. Volunteers are needed to help set up flags, work the information booth, and assist in taking down flags after the display is over.

 

The History of Labor Day!

Today is Labor Day and, ironically, we celebrate it by not laboring. That’s right, for the majority of American’s today, we celebrate Labor Day by getting an extended three-day weekend to vacation, relax, or do whatever else our hearts desire.

In case you didn’t know, this year is the 125th anniversary of Labor Day being celebrated as a national holiday and what it is, is the celebration of the American worker. The U.S. Department of Labor defines Labor Day as this: “Labor Day is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.”

The first time the government recognized Labor Day was when municipal ordinances passed in 1885 and 1886. From these ordinances, a movement was developed to secure state legislation. After this, the first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but it was actually Oregon who became the first to pass it into law on February 21, 1887. More states followed suite in the years to come, but it wasn’t until June 28, 1894 that Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

It wasn’t an easy fight though to get this holiday passed, which came about by those fighting to start getting more fair working conditions and wages in this time. According to history.com, Labor Day “…originated during one of American labor history’s most dismal chapters. In the late 1800s, at the height of the Industrial Revolution in the United States, the average American worked 12-hour days and seven-day weeks in order to eke out a basic living. Despite restrictions in some states, children as young as 5 or 6 toiled in mills, factories and mines across the country, earning a fraction of their adult counterparts’ wages. People of all ages, particularly the very poor and recent immigrants, often faced extremely unsafe working conditions, with insufficient access to fresh air, sanitary facilities and breaks. As manufacturing increasingly supplanted agriculture as the wellspring of American employment, labor unions, which had first appeared in the late 18th century, grew more prominent and vocal. They began organizing strikes and rallies to protest poor conditions and compel employers to renegotiate hours and pay.”

There is far more to this historical time than can fit into one small blog, but read the history channels full article here to get all the details.

This Labor Day, while we’re grilling, relaxing, and spending time with our loved ones, let’s try to remember those who’ve gone before us to fight for many of the freedoms and rights we have today within in the workplace. AND, thanks to them, we get a long holiday weekend!